Everything I know about audio drama I learned from E’ville

Today I published the final episode of my eight-part audio drama, E’ville, over on the Unreliable Narrators site. What began as a group project became my own mission to write, produce and edit a radio-style serial. Strictly amateur, and an answer to many what-if scenarios rattling around in my head. Could I piece together such an ambitious project using crowd-sourced voice acting from my friends and cohorts? Could I deliver a series of episodes on a self-imposed schedule, eight episodes in eight weeks? Would it be any good?

Happily, all answers are yes. Well, that last one I leave to you, dear listener. But I’m satisfied with the results, as grand experiments go.

I did learn a ton. Some observations, in case I feel the need to undertake something like this again:

Nothing like starting out big. Maybe I should have tried a nice, single-episode short for starters. But where would be the fun in that? I wanted a challenge that combined my many creative interests, and by god, that’s what I got. Every writer knows that nagging idea that takes hold of your brain and refuses to piss off while you finish that other shiny project on your desk. This wasn’t going anywhere until I delivered, so I did. Perhaps a few too many characters, perhaps a few too-busy scenes for audio only. The important thing is, it’s out of my mind and I can reclaim headspace for a few other deserving projects.

Crowd-sourcing voice performances via the internet has its own rewards. The talent involved represents old friends, new colleagues, people I don’t know (yet). And it was fun to stitch together those elements of my life in one place. The drawback, of course, is that you sacrifice a good deal of control over audio quality when most of the actors are miles away–not nestled in your own, soundproof studio and using the same microphones. Given the size and disparate schedules of the cast, table reads were right out as well. But hey, I lucked into a great group of people who were quite talented and quite game.

Ah, copyright law. U.S. copyright law, in particular. Such an ungainly beast. I learned more about copyright law than anyone ever wanted to, in the name of keeping this legit. Did you know that no works published after 1923 can be safely considered in the public domain? How about that even if copyright has expired on a song, the actual recording of the song is still protected? And that’s just the beginning of the headache. (Even worse, there’s a ton of misinformation out there, mainly because copyright law confuses everyone. I started out using a 20s jazz collection the Internet Archive itself marked as “public domain,” but the recordings themselves technically are not free to use. Oops.)

TL;DR on that last paragraph, for those whose eyes have glazed over: screw U.S. copyright law and its war on the public domain. Ahem. Moving on.

Crowd-sourced sound effects rock. I knew early on I didn’t want to spend hours recording my own foley work, whacking a side of beef with a baseball bat during every fight scene. That’s where freesound.org comes in, a lovely and CC-licensed collection of sounds recorded by people from all over the world. Of course, I still spent lots of time blending them into soundscapes. But it was enormous fun piecing together a street in 1920s Emeryville using sounds from a Japanese market, a Polish bar crowd, beaches in Venezuela. Technology is grand sometimes.

I used to play in bands and learned audio recording the old, multitrack magnetic-tape way. E’ville also served as an excuse to finally wade waist-deep into modern DAW technology. The covers and original compositions for the series are all 100% sampled and sequenced. Perhaps not entirely period-appropriate–they drift from 40s lounge to 50s rockabilly at times–but I never claimed to know shit about Jazz Age composition. And hey, I collaborated with a singer in Istanbul on one track. Again, technology rocks.

Would I do it again? Perhaps, someday. But there’s a book that’s been fighting for gray matter real estate with this sucker, and its time has come.

PCH Playlist

Like many writers, I often turn to music to get me through a draft. Every project requires its own inspiration. Since I’ve found it fun to share playlists with other writers, here’s one for my most recent work, PCH Roadkill. It’s a California tale of sun, surf, aliens and shady dot-com startups. Needless to say, this one was a bit more esoteric than simply burning through a film soundtrack or looping ambient nature sounds. Enjoy.

DJ Shadow – Six Days (Soulwax Remix)
Modeselektor – Vote or Die
Mr. Bungle – The Air-Conditioned Nightmare
Tommy McCook & The Skatalites / Silver Dollar
Man or Astroman? – Bermuda Triangle Shorts
Mass Effect OST – Liara’s World
The Mermen – Scalp Salad
Mike Ladd – Housewives At Play
The Ventures – Moon Child
Aphex Twin – Shiny Metal Rods
Lene Lovich – What Will I Do Without You?
Descendents – Silly Girl
Mr. Bungle- Desert Search for Techno Allah
Modeselektor – Die Clubnummer
Dead Kennedys – Winnebago Warrior
Jack’s Mannequin – Miss Delaney
The Ventures – Slaughter On Tenth Avenue
Final Fantasy XI OST – Faded Memories – Promyvion
Guns Of Navarone – The Skatalites
Mass Effect OST – The Secret Labs [extended]
Man or Astroman? – Madness in the Streets 10
The Mermen – Brahms Symphony 3, Movement 3
Psykosonik – Secret LifeDJ Shadow – Six Days (Soulwax Remix)
Modeselektor – Vote or Die
Mr. Bungle – The Air-Conditioned Nightmare
Tommy McCook & The Skatalites / Silver Dollar
Man or Astroman? – Bermuda Triangle Shorts
Mass Effect OST – Liara’s World
The Mermen – Scalp Salad
Mike Ladd – Housewives At Play
The Ventures – Moon Child
Aphex Twin – Shiny Metal Rods
Lene Lovich – What Will I Do Without You?
Descendents – Silly Girl
Mr. Bungle- Desert Search for Techno Allah
Modeselektor – Die Clubnummer
Dead Kennedys – Winnebago Warrior
Jack’s Mannequin – Miss Delaney
The Ventures – Slaughter On Tenth Avenue
Final Fantasy XI OST – Faded Memories – Promyvion
Guns Of Navarone – The Skatalites
Mass Effect OST – The Secret Labs [extended]
Man or Astroman? – Madness in the Streets 10
The Mermen – Brahms Symphony 3, Movement 3
Psykosonik – Secret Life

No more room in hell

The day of the dead is officially here!  Today marks the release of Penumbra’s February issue (Zombie Apocalypse theme), featuring a short story by none other than… me! Woo hoo!

To celebrate, I decided to whip up a bonus feature of sorts.  Attached below is my brand spankin’ new mix dedicated to the classic zombie film, Romero’s Dawn of the Dead.  It features a track from the amazing soundtrack by Italian prog-rockers Goblin. The inspired music stands as Dario Argento’s greatest contribution to the film… well, other than financing the whole thing.  One of these days I’ll post about why it’s one of my all-time favorite films.  For now, turn up the volume and enjoy.

EDIT: If the SoundCloud widget above fails to load, as it apparently does on some platforms, the direct link is here.

And while you’re at it, pick up Penumbra and read a batch of great zombie stories that strive to do something a bit different with the genre.

Selling Bleeding Heartland was a singular milestone for me.  My internal editor often struggles with short fiction, so it’s nice to be acknowledged for a such a concise story.  This was my first submission after a directionless hiatus, and I discovered the call for entries with a day or two to spare for a hasty edit. It’s an extensive reworking of a short that was intended for a zombine zine that, unfortunately, failed to rise from the dead.  (Chia, it’s time to publish your excellent prequel as well!)

It’s a good day to die. And live again.